24 news posts related to Ocean Acidification

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Catching up with Katie Keil, 2019 Marine and Environmental Affairs graduate

As the academic year is about to get underway, we sat down with recent School of Marine and Environmental Affairs graduate Katie Keil to see what advice she might have for incoming University of Washington graduate students. What advice would you have for incoming UW graduate students? First and foremost, my advice would be to say “yes” to new experiences because here at UW, there are so many interesting, life-changing opportunities that are available to you. 

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Washington leads: connecting ocean acidification research to people who need it most

Oysters at Taylor Shellfish Farm

At the helm of EarthLab’s Washington Ocean Acidification Center are two experienced ocean scientists, but what they are trying to do is something entirely new. Terrie Klinger and Jan Newton are Salish Sea experts — one an ecologist, one an oceanographer — and they are addressing one of the biggest emerging threats to our environment today, ocean acidification. “When we first were funded by the legislature to stand up the Washington Ocean Acidification Center, there was no precedent. 

Read more at UW EarthLab »

Five curious things we now know about our oceans

Photo: J Meyer

We swim in it, the sun sets over it, love songs are written about it and it covers 70% of the earth’s surface, yet we know so little about our deep blue sea. Oceans inspire some of the most puzzling questions and greatest discoveries on earth, and here at UW, researchers from across the sciences are dedicated to better understanding what’s in them, what’s changing about them, and how we can preserve these essential parts of our habitat. 

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‘Underwater forecast’ predicts temperature, acidity and more in Puget Sound

LiveOcean map

Most of us rely on the weather forecast to choose our outfit or make outdoor plans for the weekend. But conditions underwater can also be useful to know in advance, especially if you’re an oyster farmer, a fisher or even a recreational diver. A new University of Washington computer model can predict conditions in Puget Sound and off the coast of Washington three days into the future. 

Read more at UW News »