Moving from climate science to global action: reflections from Dean Emeritus Lisa Graumlich on COP27

sign welcoming participants to COP27

I’ve been thinking — and worrying — about climate change for a long time. In 1980, I came to the University of Washington to pursue a PhD, wrestling with the problem of detecting the fingerprint of human impact on the climate system. The topic held sway with my colleagues but had no traction with the general public. All that has changed, and that change is now visible in many ways across the globe. 

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We're Hiring: Assistant or Associate Dean of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion

an image with We are Hiring text

The College of the Environment has an outstanding opportunity for an Assistant or Associate Dean of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion to join our team. As one of the world’s preeminent environmental research institutions, the University of Washington College of the Environment believes that excellent science, teaching and scholarship can only be achieved in a community which is inclusive and supportive of people of all backgrounds and identities. 

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Annual research trip off Oregon coast gives students once in a lifetime experience at sea

the tommy thompson

Most things that humans build need a little maintenance every now and again. That’s no different for the Regional Cabled Array, a high-tech engineering marvel off the Pacific Northwest coast studded with all kinds of oceanographic equipment that gives humans a real-time, 24/7 look at what’s happening under the sea surface. The lengths that scientists and engineers go to keep the array working and up to snuff is extraordinary, and they are currently at sea providing its annual check-up. 

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Whodunnit? Uncovering the mystery of a tiny toxin killing shellfish in Puget Sound

clams killed by yessotoxins

Around 50 years ago, Pacific oysters in the Puget Sound started dying at noticeably increasing rates during the summer, causing residents and scientists to wonder why. Researchers in what is now the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences investigated many factors that may cause mortalities such as bacteria, reproductive stress related to spawning and changes in other environmental conditions. The evidence collected pointed towards stress on the animals when they spawn, as the Pacific oyster spends a lot of their energy on reproduction. 

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UW Atmospheric Sciences achieves No. 1 global ranking; nearly three dozen UW subjects in top 50

student gives weather forecast

Eight University of Washington subjects ranked in the top 10 and Atmospheric Sciences moved to its position as No. 1 in the world on the Global Ranking of Academic Subjects list for 2022. The ranking, released Tuesday, was conducted by researchers at the ShanghaiRanking Consultancy, a fully independent organization dedicating to research on higher education intelligence and consultation. Other UW subjects in the top 10 include oceanography at No. 

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