28 news posts related to Science Communication

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New UW-authored children’s book offers a robot’s-eye view of the deep ocean

Author Dana Manalang and illustrator Hunter Hadaway.

After years working on a cabled observatory that monitors the Pacific Northwest seafloor and the water above, a University of Washington engineer decided to share the wonder of the deep sea with younger audiences. The result is “ROPOS and the Underwater Volcano” by Dana Manalang, an engineer at UW’s Applied Physics Laboratory. The book’s illustrator, Hunter Hadaway, is the creative director at the UW-based Center for Environmental Visualization. 

Read more at UW Today »

Student’s augmented reality game takes players to UW campus under altered climate scenarios

University of Washington Bothell’s Andrew McDonald, a student in the interactive media design program, has long been passionate about video game design. Then he heard about EarthGames, a group of researchers, game developers and students based at UW who create games to inspire climate action and accountability. “I had done some work with augmented reality before, but had never worked with it to EarthGames’ scale,” McDonald said. 

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Seven science communication projects to inspire your work

College of the Environment faculty, staff and students use countless ways to broaden the reach and impact of their work. We rounded up a few examples that illustrate the breadth, innovation and creativity that come with different kinds of science communication and outreach. Enjoy and explore the highlights from a year of great science communication. 1. Public Comment Project The Public Comment Project seeks to promote evidence-based policy by facilitating scientists’ engagement in public comment on federal regulations. 

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Using infosonics to tap into the emotional side of climate change

Judy Twedt remembers the moment when she started to think differently about her work on climate change: when the U.S. pulled out of the Paris Agreement. “It was a turning point for me. I realized I needed to start engaging with people on an emotional level.” She thought deeply about how she wanted to spend the remaining two years of her PhD work at the University of Washington, and how to build the emotional connection of climate change as a centerpiece of her dissertation. 

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