32 news posts related to Science Communication

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Earth Tones: the student podcast to listen to this International Women’s Day

Alanna Greene and Rachel Fricke

Rachel Fricke and Alanna Greene don’t just want you to know about UW’s scientists, they want you to like them too. That’s what’s driving the two seniors at The UW’s School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences to broadcast Earth Tones, a weekly podcast dedicated to showcasing University of Washington science grads and the stories naturally emerging from their research. The podcast is a labor of love for Fricke and Greene, who both believe that the human stories associated with scientific research—the personalities, pitfalls and the comedy—are often as relevant as the core findings more commonly published. 

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An interview with FieldNotes

The FieldNotes editorial team.

Undergraduate students dedicate incredible time and effort each year to complete a capstone or other required research project, but the results are rarely published in a scientific journal. In spring 2018, four students from the College of the Environment set out to give the authors of this overlooked body of work a creative platform in which to share their work. The first issue of FieldNotes featured research on diverse topics, including the relationship between beaver dams and salmon migration, the impacts of ocean acidification on Puget Sound oysters and UW Environment’s efforts to promote STEM-based initiatives in underrepresented communities. 

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UW, Tableau create interactive tool to explore more than a century of Pacific Northwest weather observations

Lummi Island storm waves

UW College of the Environment and Seattle visual analytics company Tableau Software teamed up to create a new, interactive visualization for historical observations of temperature and precipitation in Washington, Oregon, Idaho and western Montana, and for Washington snowpack. The free online tool lets anybody interact with the records going back as far as 1881 and look for significant trends. “This tool lets anyone, from researchers to meteorologists to members of the public, look at the actual data to motivate why we should care about our climate changing, and see how it is changing in our own backyard,” said project lead Karin Bumbaco, the assistant state climatologist for Washington. 

Read more at UW Today »

New UW-authored children’s book offers a robot’s-eye view of the deep ocean

Author Dana Manalang and illustrator Hunter Hadaway.

After years working on a cabled observatory that monitors the Pacific Northwest seafloor and the water above, a University of Washington engineer decided to share the wonder of the deep sea with younger audiences. The result is “ROPOS and the Underwater Volcano” by Dana Manalang, an engineer at UW’s Applied Physics Laboratory. The book’s illustrator, Hunter Hadaway, is the creative director at the UW-based Center for Environmental Visualization. 

Read more at UW Today »